Products & Services

Investments

  • Common StockA security that represents partial ownership of a corporation. Those who hold common stock are entitled to participate in stockholder meetings, to vote for the board of directors, and may receive periodic dividends.
  • BondsA debt instrument under which the issuer promises to pay a specified amount of interest and to repay the principal at maturity. The market value of a bond will fluctuate with changes in interest rates. As rates rise, the value of existing bonds typically falls. If an investor sells a bond before maturity, it may be worth more or less than the initial purchase price. By holding a bond to maturity, an investor will receive the interest payments due plus his or her original principal, barring default by the issuer. Investments seeking to achieve higher yields also involve a higher degree of risk.
  • Exchange Traded Funds (ETF)A share of an investment company that owns a block of shares selected to pursue a specific investment objective. ETFs trade like stocks and are listed on stock exchanges and sold by broker-dealers. Exchange-traded funds are sold only by prospectus. Please consider the charges, risks, expenses, and investment objectives carefully before investing. A prospectus containing this and other information about the investment company can be obtained from your financial professional. Read it carefully before you invest or send money.
  • Mutual FundsA pooled investment account offered by an investment company. Mutual funds pool the monies of many investors and then invest the money to pursue the fund’s stated objectives. The resulting portfolio of investments is managed by the investment company. Mutual fund balances are subject to fluctuation in value and market risk. Shares, when redeemed, may be worth more or less than their original cost. Mutual funds are sold only by prospectus. Individuals are encouraged to consider the charges, risks, expenses, and investment objectives carefully before investing. A prospectus containing this and other information about the investment company can be obtained from your financial professional. Read it carefully before you invest or send money.
  • OptionsTooltip text
  • Structured ProductsTooltip text
  • Alternative InvestmentsTooltip text
  • Treasury Bills/NotesDebt securities issued by the United States government. Treasury bills normally have maturities of less than one year, while Treasury notes have maturities between one and 10 years, and Treasury bonds have maturities between 10 and 30 years. U.S. Treasury securities are guaranteed by the federal government as to the timely payment of principal and interest. However, if you sell a Treasury security prior to maturity, it could be worth more or less than the original price paid.
  • AnnuitiesA contract with an insurance company that guarantees current or future payments in exchange for a premium or series of premiums. The interest earned on an annuity contract is not taxable until the funds are paid out or withdrawn. Withdrawals and income payments are taxed as ordinary income. If a withdrawal is made prior to age 59½, penalties may apply. The guarantees of an annuity contract depend on the issuing company’s claims-paying ability. Annuities have fees and charges associated with the contract, and a surrender charge also may apply if the contract owner elects to give up the annuity before certain time-period conditions are satisfied.

Financial Planning

  • Retirement PlanningTooltip text
  • 401(k) PlanningA qualified retirement plan available to eligible employees of companies. 401(k) plans allow eligible employees to defer taxation on a specific percentage of their income that is to be put toward retirement savings; taxes on this deferred income and on any earnings the account generates are deferred until the funds are withdrawn—normally in retirement. Employers may match part or all of an employee’s contributions. Employees may be responsible for investment selections and enjoy the direct tax savings.
  • 403(b) PlanningA 403(b) plan is similar to a 401(k). A 403(b) is a qualified retirement plan available to employees of non-profit and government organizations.
  • College PlanningTooltip text
  • Estate PlanningTooltip text
  • Money Purchasing PlanningTooltip text
  • Profit Sharing PlanningTooltip text
  • Tax StrategiesTooltip text
  • Asset ManagementTooltip text

Insurance

  • Estate PlanningTooltip text
  • Life InsuranceTooltip text
  • Long-Term-Care InsuranceTooltip text
  • Disability Income InsuranceTooltip text

Account Types

  • Trusts: Tooltip text
  • Community Property Tooltip text
  • Individual Tooltip text
  • Dynasty TrustsTooltip text
  • Charitable TrustsTooltip text
  • Special Needs Trusts Tooltip text
  • Defined Benefit PlansTooltip text
  • Profit Sharing PlansTooltip text
  • 401K PlansTooltip text
  • Traditional IRATooltip text
  • Roth IRATooltip text
  • SEP IRATooltip text
  • Simple IRATooltip text
  • Educational IRATooltip text